Today’s New York Times features an op-ed by Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, on the oncology drug shortage. It’s a serious problem that’s had too-little attention in the press:

Of the 34 generic cancer drugs on the market, as of this month, 14 were in short supply. They include drugs that are the mainstay of treatment regimens used to cure leukemia, lymphoma and testicular cancer.

Emanuel considers that these cancer drug shortages have led to what amounts to an accidental rationing of cancer meds. Some desperate and/or influential patients (or doctors or hospitals) get their planned chemo and the rest, well, don’t.

Unfortunately, what’s behind this harmful mess is neither a dearth of ingredients nor unsolvable problems at most of the manufacturing plants. Rather, the missing chemotherapies are mainly old and inexpensive, beyond their patent protection, i.e. they’re not so profitable, and not high-priority.

Emanuel proposes that the prices of old oncology meds – drugs that can cost as little as $3 per dose – be raised so that the companies will make it their business to provide them. This seems like a reasonable idea, although I find it a bit too compromising. Why should we raise the costs of any medications above what’s necessary for their manufacture and distribution?

The underlying problem is that we rely on a profit motive to deliver needed health care in the U.S. This kind of financial incentive, even if you find it morally acceptable, doesn’t seem to be working.

That’s why I favor scrapping the system – in which insurance companies siphon off some 30 percent or so of expenses, and pharmaceutical companies take another big cut – and giving patients the care they need, profits aside.

The health care reform bill of 2010 didn’t go far enough. Not even close.

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