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I have to admit that when I first read about the FDA’s report tying rare cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma to breast implants, my mind raced with a strange blend of excitement, intense interest and concern. My thoughts shifted from “wow, that’s really interesting” to “exactly what did the FDA find” to “should I be worried?”

So I’ve decided to write this morning’s post from my perspective as an oncologist who spent roughly 15 years of her life studying the causes of lymphomas and related blood malignancies. Some readers of this blog, who fortunately at this point in ML’s slow-but-steady growth are mainly strangers, may be unaware that understanding rare lymphomas was what I lived for in my research work, which occupied the bulk of my time and thought, which I loved very much (as strange as that may seem to some) and which I miss intensely, still, today.

The reality, as very-carefully documented by the FDA in its excellent analysis (which, in my opinion, far surpasses that of most case series reported in the medical literature; I’d give the agency an A+ for detail, thoroughness, clarity and openness about the limitations of the findings thus far), is that these cases of ALCL are few and far between: a total of 60 cases, worldwide, as I reviewed in yesterday’s post. Sometimes just a few cases are indicative of a problem, and I think that is exactly what’s going on with these rare lymphomas.

The pathology is interesting: Essentially all of the ALCL cases are T-cell derived and express CD30. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) was negative in each of 26 cases examined for that receptor. The findings are plausible in the context of an aberrant immune response – which can occasionally become malignant – to a foreign body or particular antigen associated with the implants. These oddly uniform characteristics among these rare lymphoma cases support that the FDA’s findings are not random.

Most of the ALCL tumors were limited to the area of the implant capsules, and could – as best I can tell from the few reports – be treated by removal of the implants and affected, adjacent breast tissue. These don’t appear to be aggressive lymphomas, as are some ALCL’s. I would go as far as to speculate that these might indeed be antigen-driven tumors; in this light, it would make sense in principle and in practice to treat these by removal of the implants, at least as a first-line approach.

So if I had a patient with this condition, I’d tell her that these lymphomas are very rare and, when they do arise, can usually be treated by removal of the implant. But I wouldn’t down-play the risk, which is tiny but real.

As an oncologist, I found most of the coverage of the FDA’s alert disappointing, the discussion dominated by plastic surgeons’ reassurances and device makers’ dismissals. Statements like “a woman is more likely to be struck by lightning than get this condition” – proffered by an Allergan spokeswoman as quoted and emphasized in the WSJ Health Blog, Bloomberg News, LA Times and elsewhere – are not helpful to women with implants who are genuinely concerned about their health.

Because I understand that once a woman has had one form of cancer, her risk of developing another tumor is elevated – from whatever genetic, environmental or other disposition she has for malignancy, and from treatment toxicity. Most of the women I’ve seen with implants after mastectomies have some problems considered minor – like thickening of the capsule and dimpling in peri-implant tissue. But these are the exact sort of abnormalities as described in the FDA’s alert, for which there is now a recommendation: evaluate and report cases to the FDA.

Ultimately this is an issue about informed consent – and I don’t mean by this the paperwork, but the reality of women with choosing, or not, to get breast implants. Doctors need more information about these rare lymphomas: how often these arise, why they occur, and how they should be managed so as to cause the least harm when and if treatment is necessary.

The FDA provides a helpful list of sources, from which I’ve selected those that seem most relevant (see reference page). Of historic interest, also, is a NEJM perspective from 15 years ago on the debate about rheumatologic illness, the public’s perception and risks associated with breast implants.

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