On Admitting Nice, Ethically-Minded People to Med School

This week the Times ran a leading story on a new med school admission process, with multiple, mini-interviews, like speed dating. The idea is to assess applicants’ social, communication and ethical thinking (?) skills:

…It is called the multiple mini interview, or M.M.I., and its use is spreading. At least eight medical schools in the United States — including those at Stanford, the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Cincinnati — and 13 in Canada are using it.

At Virginia Tech Carilion, 26 candidates showed up on a Saturday in March and stood with their backs to the doors of 26 small rooms. When a bell sounded, the applicants spun around and read a sheet of paper taped to the door that described an ethical conundrum. Two minutes later, the bell sounded again and the applicants charged into the small rooms and found an interviewer waiting. A chorus of cheerful greetings rang out, and the doors shut. The candidates had eight minutes to discuss that room’s situation. Then they moved to the next room, the next surprise conundrum…

This sounds great, at first glance. We all want friendly doctors who get along. It might even be fun, kind of like a game. (Sorry for the cynicism, injected in here, but it’s needed.) I’d even bet that the interviewers and successful interviewees would emerge feeling good about the process and themselves.

But don’t you think most premed students, who get through college, and numerous letters of recommendation, take the MCATS and achieve scores high enough to get an interview, are smart enough to get through this social test without failing? It’s what these young men and women are thinking, internally, that matters. According to the same article, the country’s 134 medical schools have long relied almost entirely on grades and the MCAT to sort through over 42,000 applicants for nearly 19,000 slots.

My math: that means nearly 19 out of 42 (almost half!) of med school applicants get in, here in the U.S.

If we want future doctors who are smart enough to guide patients through tough, data-loaded, evidence-based and ethically-complex decisions, we should make the academic requirements for entry more rigorous, especially in the areas of science, math and analytical thinking.

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TV Meets Real Life Oncology, and Anticipating the MCATs

Yesterday I wrote on some tough decisions facing a TV show‘s protagonist. She’s got metastatic melanoma and might participate in a clinical trial when the show resumes.

Now imagine you’re an oncologist, or a real patient with this killing disease – you really need to be on top of new developments, to understand the pros and cons, because someone’s life depends on it.

If you’re the doctor in the relationship, you need keep abreast of current information for all the other tumors types of patients in your care: what are the new findings, if any, what are the limitations of the data. You need to know how the advances apply to an individual person who, most likely, has another condition or two, like high blood pressure or, say, osteoporosis.

Oncologists ought to be familiar with new drugs, and how those compare to old ones, and the side effects, and the distinctions between tumors with and without BRAF mutations. They should know what BRAF stands for.

Melanoma is one form of skin cancer. We understand now there are breast cancer subtypes – with distinct behavior and responsiveness to treatments, with and without inherited and acquired genetic mutations (BRCA-1 and -2 were identified well over 10 years ago; there’s much more known now), dozens of lymphoma forms and innumerable leukemia subtypes. Lung cancer, prostate cancer, brain cancer… Each is a group of diseases.

But the science physicians apply in their work doesn’t just apply in oncology. Even in traditionally “softer” fields of medicine, like pediatrics, doctors need to know how congenital diseases are diagnosed with newer, cheaper methods for testing mutations; in gynecology, doctors need to know about inherited clotting dispositions; in psychiatry, doctors give medicines with complex metabolic effects that involve, or should involve, some grounding in modern neuroscience.

This is why we need to keep the MCAT hard. (I’ll write more on this current issue in medical education, soon.)

Have a great weekend!

ES

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