This post, on my research in cancer immunology, is strangely personal.

At one level, what follows is nothing more than a list, a narrative if you will, a sketch of a formative chunk of my career and personal history. I’ve wanted to put this out there (here) for quite a while, but couldn’t: It’s been hard for me, harder in some ways than was the breast cancer and spine surgery and all the other unpleasant illnesses I haven’t mentioned yet, to come to grips with my near-hit academic medial research career that stopped, which until today has been for the most part disconnected from this blog and my new on-line life.

So here goes, a partial list of my publications, selected from ~30:

On a novel mechanism for B-cell death, my first first-author article based on my research in lymphoma immunology, in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, 1995:

CD40 ligation induces Apo-1/Fas expression on human B lymphocytes and facilitates apoptosis through the Apo-1/Fas pathway

On how “helper” T cells can kill some forms of malignant B cells, in Blood, 1996:

CD4+ T-cell induction of Fas-mediated apoptosis in Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells

A solicited review of my early labwork, completed with my research mentor, in Immunologic Research, 1996:

Fas expression and apoptosis in human B cells

My first paper on CD40L and autoimmunity, in CLL, in Blood, 1998:

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Can Express CD40 Ligand and Demonstrate T-Cell Type Costimulatory Capacity

A case report (as my lab and non-physical stature grew I became senior author), in the British Journal of Haemotology, 1998:

Novel association of haemophagocytic syndrome with Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-related primary effusion lymphoma

On some experiments with mantle cell lymphoma cells, in Leukemia, 2000:

Proliferative response of mantle cell lymphoma cells stimulated by CD40 ligation and IL-4

Work accomplished with colleagues-now-friends, in Blood, 2000:

Inhibition of NF-kB induces apoptosis of KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells

The first major paper from my NIH-funded lab, in The Journal of Immunology, 2000:

Modulation of NF-kB Activity and Apoptosis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

We sent this one to Science. They declined. So did a bunch of other journals. Eventually it came out in Blood, 2001:

Survival of leukemic B cells promoted by engagement of the antigen receptor

A nearly life-eating chapter that took up way too much of my time but was probably worthwhile nonetheless, on immunology, for a Neoplastic Hematopathology textbook, in 2001:

Immune System: Structure and Function

An interesting story, we thought, in Autoimmunity, 2002:

Inhibition of Fas-mediated apoptosis by antigen: implications for lymphomagenesis

A monograph I wrote around the time I got sick, on how malignant lymphocytes die, somewhat theoretical, in Cancer Investigation, 2002:

Apoptosis in Lymphocytic Leukemias and Lymphomas

For there record, there’s earlier and later stuff too, by me alone and with others, and (sadly) reams of unpublished data, mainly from 1997 – 2002. These are the published papers I consider most my own.

Looking back, I’m pretty sure we were right, at least on most of these findings.

(Is there an opposite-of-decline effect?)

I’ve often wondered how differently things might have turned out if there’d been blogs and open-access journals with real-time comments when we in my lab were trying to get our work published in top, grant-renewing, tenure-securing journals.

Didn’t happen…

Well, now that this is done, I can keep moving forward!

With gratitude to my colleagues who collaborated, and especially to those who worked with me in the lab,


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