A new report was published on-line this afternoon by the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO). It covers a Phase III (randomized) clinical trial of Avastin (Bevacizumab) in women with metastatic BC. Over 1200 patients were included in the analysis, all with Her2 negative disease.

The design of the randomized study protocol was a bit unusual, in that the treating physicians could choose among a few, standard chemo options to give their patients – the so-called “backbone” for treatment for each cohort in the trial, along with hormonal treatment and the study drug: Avastin or a placebo. Avastin is a monoclonal antibody that binds to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It’s manufactured by Roche and is quite costly.

What the investigators report, now, is that women who received Avastin and any of the chemo regimens did better – in terms of what’s called progression free survival – than did those who received the same chemo and placebo treatment. The difference was a matter of a few months, on average, and there were no measurable change in overall survival. What this means is that in some women with metastatic breast cancer, Avastin appears to help keep the disease in check.

The study is called RIBBON-1, which I learned this evening would be for the first study of Regimens in Bevacizumab for Breast Oncology. Sounds lame, I know, but believe me – it’s hard for oncologists to keep trials straight without acronyms. Even with the acronyms.

It happens I know some women with triple negative BC who have benefited from Avastin. These women may be outliers on the curve, but they are real and they exist and I know them personally, in what should be the middle of their lives.

Maybe we, and the FDA, shouldn’t give up so fast on Avastin.

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